The Drawing of the Three

The Drawing of the Three

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In 1978, Stephen King introduced the world to the last gunslinger, Roland of Gilead.  Nothing has been the same since. More than twenty years later, the quest for the Dark Tower continues to take readers on a wildly epic ride. Through parallel worlds and across time, Roland must brave desolate wastelands and endless deserts, drifting into the unimaginable and the familiar. A classic tale of colossal scope--crossing over terrain from The Stand , The Eyes of the Dragon , Insomnia , The Talisman , Black House , Hearts in Atlantis , 'Salem's Lot , and other familiar King haunts--the adventure takes hold with the turn of each page.

And the tower awaits....

The Second Volume in the Epic Dark Tower Series…

The Drawing of the Three

While pursuing his quest for the Dark Tower through a world that is a nightmarishly distorted mirror image of our own, Roland is drawn through a mysterious door that brings him into contemporary America.

Here he links forces with the defiant young Eddie Dean, and with the beautiful, brilliant, and brave Odetta Holmes, in a savage struggle against underworld evil and otherworldly enemies.

Once again, Stephen King has masterfully interwoven dark, evocative fantasy and icy realism.
ISBN: 9780451210852
Branch Call Number: Fantasy

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awebster92
Oct 09, 2017

After reading the first book in the Dark Tower series, I knew I wanted to read the rest. I was in no rush as I didn't enjoy the book as much as most did. It was a 3 star read for me. A friend of mine told me they get considerably better adding that the movie wasn't based on a single book. I decided to give it a second go. I finished the first a year ago, so it's time.

Unlike the first book, I was surprisingly hooked in with this book. I didn't feel like any of the characters fell flat or were forced. A few bits made me uneasy, but I enjoyed it. I knew a lot of people were upset with the casting of Idris Elba as Roland because he isn't white. Even more, people came out saying 'The gunslinger's race is never mentioned.' While I LOVE the casting choice, I know the people that said that never read the books. One of the central points in this book is that he is white. It's not just mentioned, it's pounded into your head on almost every page. Whitewashing has always happened to Minorities, and either way, Idris is still an excellent choice. That being said, If you haven't read the books, don't make false claims.

I can't wait to see what happens in the third book. I've already put a hold on the audiobook at my library. If you were thinking about quitting the series after the first book, it's worth another go. I know I'm glad I gave it a shot.

KateHillier Jul 30, 2017

Volume 2 of the Dark Tower saga drops us right back with an ailing Roland - whose luck turns from bad to worse as he crawls toward an open door. A door that takes him into our world and into the mind of heroin addicted Eddie Dean. He is the first of three people whom Roland must 'draw' in order to continue his quest for the dark tower. After Eddie there is "The Lady of Shadows" (Odetta Holmes and her dark personality known as Detta Walker). Then there is the third, a third that I won't get into here.

Roland has been along on his quest for so long and he's still reeling from the terrible choice he had to make in the previous book. Roland does not want to get attached to these people but it happens all the same, and they know exactly where they are at end of the day on Roland's priority list but the Dark Tower has a pull on everyone who gets sucked into it. No matter what world they're from.

We jump times in this one, deal with more horrors in Roland's world (one word: lobstrocities), and like the new characters we meet in this book, you can't help but want to journey on no matter where it leads.

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dani_lacey
Jul 17, 2017

I'm REALLY glad I decided to continue with The Dark Tower series beyond The Gunslinger. Book two of the series is much more character-driven and cohesive than the first one. The gunslinger himself is a much more interesting character, and I love the two new additions to his crew: Eddie and Susannah. It was so great to see Eddie grow from a smuggling junkie to a gunslinger in his own right. And, while I hated, hated, HATED Detta's ridiculous jive talk, I really enjoyed the suspense she created in the book and the final resolution of her character.

The action in this book was amazing. The firefight between the gunslinger and Eddie versus the New York mafiosos was some of the best action I've ever read. The lobstrosities legit gave me nightmares. And, again, Detta was just a menace, but a menace that kept you on the edge of your seat. If the rest of the series continues like this, I'm definitely in it 'til the finish.

j
jeprokx_
Jul 14, 2016

Another really good addition to the Dark Tower series. It transitioned nicely between the events from the last book and the inclusion of the new characters in this one. How they were brought in was great. Stephen King does not disappoint.

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danielestes
Nov 04, 2014

The first volume, The Gunslinger, was alright. Remarkable in some areas; tediously slow and bewildering in others. Stephen King likes to work out his stories as he writes, which allows for some frickin' brilliant narration, but then consistency errors tend to compound if his work spans multiple volumes. This very problem will hamper the Dark Tower series later on. For now though, here near the start of the quest, Roland's world is largely unexplored and flush with possibility.

The Drawing of the Three, volume two in King's Dark Tower opus, is where the tone starts to resemble the series we fans have come to love. Roland's palaver with the Man in Black at the end of the last book has left him somewhat aimless, his singular goal to reach the Dark Tower now complicated by this additional undertaking to draw three companions into his world. What the Man in Black's purpose is in all of this remains a mystery for now.

This is Stephen King at near the top of his game in my opinion. The characters come alive, almost entirely via their back-and-forth verbal exchanges. King is an especially gifted writer of dialogue. The Lady of Shadows in particular will make you cringe. You'll see what I mean. Also, the pacing, the mounting tension, and humor hit all the right beats. If The Drawing of the Three doesn't leave you craving more of the Dark Tower story, then cry off the trail now.

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erinsnest
Nov 05, 2013

Started Thurs. Oct 30, 2013 Didn't understand "The Gunslinger" at all, but thought I'd continue with the series and see how it went. I'm enjoying this second book much more.....Tues Nov 5, on page 166.

SB2000 Mar 22, 2013

The second installment in King's "Dark Tower" series and my favourite of the seven. A much larger book than The Gunslinger, it introduces the remaining characters in Roland's world and alludes to things that will happen later in the series. For some reason, the opening scene on a beach in the limbo-earth that Roland inhabits is particularly horrifying.

b
becker
Jan 20, 2013

This second book in the series is nothing at all like the first book which I loved (Gunslinger). This 2nd book was a little ridiculous at times but it seems that King is using this book to set up the characters for the rest of the series. Even though I found it a bit silly, it was still a good story that leaves you wanting to know what happens next.

o
oldman74
Feb 10, 2011

this is my favorite book of the dark tower series. and, in my opinion, among the top five of all stephen king books.

for those people that associate horror stories with king, this book isn't scary at all, but instead very imaginative and slightly on the side of modern day fantasy adventure.

although you could start with this book and after 20 pages have a good idea what is going on, i would suggest getting the first book, the gunslinger, since it is only about 100-150 pages (very short).

as for other stephen king books, the long walk (penned as richard bachman) is also in his top five ever written and also a very fast read at less than 300 pages.

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gavingmiller
Aug 12, 2017

gavingmiller thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

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bambi99
Jan 04, 2013

bambi99 thinks this title is suitable for 10 years and over

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