Fury

Fury

A Novel

Book - 2001
Average Rating:
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Professor Malik Solanka, retired historian of ideas, irascible doll maker, and since his recent fifty-fifth birthday celibate and solitary by his own (much criticized) choice, in his silvered years found himself living in a golden age. Outside his window, a long humid summer, the first hot season of the third millennium, baked and perspired. The city boiled with money. Rents and property values had never been higher, and in the garment industry it was widely held that fashion had never been so fashionable. - from Fury From one of the world's truly great writers comes a wickedly brilliant and pitch-black comedy about a middle-aged professor who finds himself in New York City in the summer of 2000. Not since the Bombay of Midnight's Children have a time and place been so intensely captured in a novel. Salman Rushdie's eighth novel opens on a New York living at break-neck speed in an age of unprecedented decadence. Malik Solanka, a Cambridge-educated self-made millionaire originally from Bombay, arrives in this town of IPOs and white-hot trends looking, perversely, for escape. He is a man in flight from himself. This former philosophy professor is the inventor of a hugely popular doll whose multiform ubiquity - as puppet, cartoon and talk-show host - now rankles with him. He becomes frustratingly estranged from his own creation. At the same time, his marriage is disintegrating, and Solanka very nearly commits an unforgivable act. Horrified by the fury within him, he flees across the Atlantic. He discovers a city roiling with anger, where cab drivers spout invective and a serial killer is murdering women with a lump of concrete, a metropolis whose population is united by petty spats and bone-deep resentments. His own thoughts, emotions and desires, meanwhile, are also running wild. He becomes deeply embroiled in not one but two new liaisons, both, in very different ways, dangerous. Professor Solanka's navigation of his new world makes for a hugely entertaining and compulsively readable novel. Fury is a pitiless comedy that lays bare, with spectacular insight and much glee, the darkest side of human nature.
Publisher: Toronto : Alfred A. Knopf Canada, c2001.
Edition: 1st ed. --
ISBN: 9780676974409
0676974406
Branch Call Number: FIC/Rushd 6173mb 1
Characteristics: 259 p.

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lukasevansherman
Oct 09, 2014

"Life is fury, he'd thought. Fury-sexual, Oedipal, political, magical, brutal-drives us to our finest heights and coarsest depths."
Salman Rushdie enjoys the rare status of being a celebrity author who is acclaimed, feted, and known even by those who don't read. "Midnight's Children," still his best book by a Bombay mile, is ranked as one of the greatest, most influential novels of the past three decades. He was also married to a beautiful model/TV host (there's a 10/90 %) to whom this book is dedicated. Yet, in this novel from 2001, none of that seems enough. It is Rushdie's America novel and, while I'm no knee-jerk patriot, there is something irritating about an author moving to a country that has embraced him and proceeding to tell us everything that's wrong with American culture. He does so in the most crude and obvious way, comparing America to Imperial Rome and castigating our noise, shallowness, pop culture, and celebrities, whose names he has no problem dropping in such a way that would make Brent Easton Ellis blush. Remember, this an author who hangs out with Bono. It's a singularly acrid and unpleasant book that takes the worst aspects of Bellow and Roth and magnifies them into something that is caricature without humor and satire without insight. A shameful performance from a once great writer.
"It is one thing to write an allegory or an apologia about how America has compromised one's soul, but it is quite another to publish a novel that so emphatically re-enacts that compromise."-James Wood, The New Yorker

j
JBull
Dec 03, 2010

In Rushdie's books, you see that he really understands how the world works. He predicts 9/11 in this one, and in the novel that spawned his fatwa, there is a character named Salman who changes the words of Mohammed and is condemned for it.

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